So if you find a unknown brand 32-inch TV for $99 compared to the $149 for the known brand, don’t be afraid to go with the former.

5. Don’t Buy an Extended Warranty Or Expensive Cables
For years, electronics stores have boosted their profits by selling extended warranties to TV shoppers, sometimes using fear tactics to make people think their sets will fall apart the day after the manufacturer’s warranty expires.

But nearly every TV set comes with a one-year warranty on parts and a multiple-month warranty on labor. If the set is a lemon — ready to collapse into a thousand pieces with a single touch — you’ll find out shortly after you bring it home. And if that happens, your manufacturer’s warranty will cover any repairs.

Plus, some credit cards will extend a product’s warranty for an extra year for free. Check with your credit card company before buying a store’s extended warranty.

And, finally, TVs, even today’s sleeker flat-screen sets, are built to last. The number of sets that need repairs in the first few years are estimated to be around five percent. That’s not a high number. And, as we just noted, if your set does need a repair in the first year or two, it’s likely it will be covered by your manufacturer’s warranty plus your credit card’s warranty extension.

It’s also important to note that you should never buy expensive HDMI cables after you purchase the TV. The technology in TV cables is almost identical; one does not offer a better picture than another. So you can buy one under $20 without fear it will be ineffective, despite what the salesperson may say.

You can check out the latest TV sales here at Amazon.com.